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@kejt_plantlover      238 posts 14,7k followers

Can you tell us a bit about yourself. Where you’re from, how old you are (not necessary), a description of how you live, your job, hobby’s, etc. Or anything else you feel comfortable sharing.

My name is Kasia (eng. Kate), I come from Poland and currently live in Krakow. I am 31 years old and I am a sociologist. My work focuses on the study and analysis of consumer behavior and motivation. Watching people and what they do and, most of all, why they do it, is really fascinating. Also, I love to cook, my friends laugh that I basically live in the kitchen. For some time I even hosted a culinary program on TV, which unfortunately no longer exists, and later I also managed the largest Facebook culinary community in the country, for which I created video recipes with my team. Well, clearly I can’t complain about being bored and sitting still. There always has to be something going on in my life! I try to live by the idea of minimalism, focusing on quality rather than quantity. Nature is very important to me and it’s the contact with it, also in the form of houseplants, that allows me to catch my breath in the crazy everyday reality.

When did you start with having and taking care of PLNTS and why?

I started getting interested in plants almost 5 years ago, but the first were herbs that I grew and used in my kitchen. Haha I said I cook a lot! Later, when I found out that I had a ‘good hand’ with them, I thought maybe it was time to try something more ‘advanced’. The truth is that plants have been with me all my life, however unconsciously. I grew up in a house where there was always a place for them.  I still remember my grandmother’s huge palm trees and ficus trees and the ivy climbing up the wall and ceiling of my second grandmother’s living room. My mother had a floor-to-ceiling flower stand that was always full of pots. I must confess, however, that I paid absolutely no attention to them at the time.  I never thought I’d go crazy over houseplants myself someday!

“The truth is that plants have been with me all my life, however unconsciously. I grew up in a house where there was always a place for them.”

In these strange times, have you tried any new plant activities or learned any fun new plant tricks?

I’ve definitely started to devote more time to my plants because, with my switch to working remotely, I have the opportunity to do so! I started pruning and propagating my collection, and then ‘infecting’ (although these days that’s not the best word) my friends with my passion for plants. I won’t lie if I say that at least 15 people were drawn into this world!  During the pandemic I also started experimenting with simple DIY fertilizers, including my favorite – homemade banana peel fertilizer. Even the most stubborn plants wake up to life after a dose of it and pop out new leaves. The recipe is simple: just pour boiling water over a few banana peels and leave them in a closed jar/container in a dark, warm place for a few days, making sure to shake them a few times each day. The fertilizer is ready to use, just strain the peels and add the liquid to the water you water your plants with. It’s been a real hit with my followers!

You never forget your first love, and most plant parents never forget the first plant they adopt into their family. What was yours? Can you remember your first PLNT, is it still alive?

Of course I remember! The first was a Dracaena, bought at a nearby grocery store during the usual shopping. It cost next to nothing, so I thought I would have a go and try not to kill it. Fortunately, it turned out to be almost maintenance free and it worked – 5 years later it is still alive, well and taking up more and more space. I have a lot of fondness for her. Right after that I went crazy about succulents but…. I didn’t do too well with them. I regularly overplanted them until I finally decided to give almost the entire collection into better hands.  I was also very excited about my first rare plant which was philodendron pink princess. It is also alive, it even gave birth to a few seedlings.

“During the pandemic I also started experimenting with simple DIY fertilizers, including my favorite – homemade banana peel fertilizer.”

If you could go back in time, what would you tell yourself about plant parenthood when you adopted your first plant?

Stop watering them! Haha as an inexperienced green mom, I notoriously overwatered all my plants. My lack of knowledge was fatal to many of them (so sorry!). I would also tell myself ‘slow down, calm down, buy more sensibly’. In the beginning, in a wave of new passion, I bought a lot of plants, often ones I didn’t know how to take care of. Plus gadgets, accessories, tons of unnecessary stuff. I was very susceptible to marketing tricks. Fortunately, as time passed and I gained experience, I learned not to buy plants that I don’t get along with.

What is your favourite variety of plants and why have you chosen it?

I unconditionally love the Araceae: Philodendron, Monstera, Rhaphidophora, Pothos are my favourite. They are very forgiving and resistant to changing amount of light – and in winter in Poland it gets dark already at 4 pm! I remember that when I started to be interested in plants I was surprised how many species of Philodendrons there are. I keep discovering some new ones that I had no idea about! I also like Begonias, I have a weakness for the dotted ones. And the undisputed queen of my jungle is Monstera deliciosa big form, which takes half of my living room.

Are there any influencers in the plant world you go to for inspiration?

I am totally in love with Craig Miller-Randle, or rather his home jungle. His collection is stunning and the size of the rare specimens is mind blowing. Shelley Caruana‘s posts always make me smile and I enjoy looking into her. And mariahgrows often inspires me, I really enjoy her videos. Igor and Judith from UrbanJungle are great too, I have both their books. Instagram is so full of inspiration that I have to dose myself with it, otherwise I would either go bankrupt or have to constantly change my apartment for a bigger one. I already decided to do that once, just because of the plants!

What plants are still on your wish lists for 2021?

On my wish list for this year are Rhaphidophora decursiva and Philodendron gloriosum. I’m always looking for plants that I instantly fall in love with, which is why it takes so long haha. It’s not about just getting them, but about finding the perfect one. This year I’ve already managed to get Philodendron elegans and Philodendron mayoi, which were also on my list for 2021. I remember times when there used to be basically no month without me going plant-shopping. Now I take a calmer approach to my purchases, they are much more thoughtful and selective, and therefore less frequent.

How did you manage to let your PLNTS survive in the heat of the summer? Any tips?

Hot weather can be problematic, especially considering how much the climate in Poland has changed over the past few years. The main rescue for my plants is an air humidifier. It really works wonders! In the summer I regularly give my plants a home spa, taking them to do the shower. I wash the leaves, but also rinse the soil in the pot. Fortunately, Philodendrons have an excellent tolerance for heat and do not require very moist soil, so I do not have to worry about them too much.

“…the undisputed queen of my jungle is Monstera deliciosa big form, which takes half of my living room.”

You are something of a plant expert by this point. Do you have any tips for new/expecting plant parents?

Above all, observe your plants. There is no golden advice, no universal truths on how to care for plants. Every climate is different, weather and housing conditions vary. Plants communicate with us, showing us immediately when something is wrong. It is enough to learn to read these signals. My grandmother was a master at this. She grew her plants in an extraordinary way, and she did not use any special cultivation techniques, species-specific soil mixtures, humidifiers or expensive fertilizers. She simply watched her plants every day, talked to them and let them grow in peace. I have the same philosophy! Of course, when in doubt, it is always better not to water than to overwater. And something I really strongly believe in: less is more. Plants need room to grow and their owners need time to care for them. Plant fashions have caused more and more people to buy dozens of plants. And the more of them there are, the less time we have for them and the less space they have to grow. It is not the number of pots in the collection that should be most important! And one more thing: don’t worry when things don’t go your way. It builds your experience. And most plants have one job anyway – to grow. So at worst, cut it down to zero and let it grow again. It really ALWAYS works!

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DIY: potting and growing your own Stephania erecta

Are you an experienced plant parent who is up for a challenge? Then you and the Stephania erecta are the perfect match. With your green fingers, you can transform this large ‘potato’ into perfection!

The Stephania erecta is a tuberous plant that you grow yourself from a potato-like bulb into a beautiful climbing plant with characteristic coin-shaped leaves. She grows during spring and summer, but in wintertime, she drops her leaves and goes dormant. Stephania then has a nice, long sleep and doesn’t wake up till spring arrives. Oh, what a life – we envy her.

In this blog, we’ll explain how to pot your erecta bulb and help you grow a beautiful plant out of your bulb.

The Stephania erecta is native to the tropical forests of Asia and Australia, where she grows in peat moss and likes to swing up against trees. She thrives best in high humidity and likes a warm, light spot, but no direct sunlight. Once she starts growing, this adventurer will climb to great heights! You definitely make her happy by giving her some climbing support.

Potting your Stephania erecta

Bath time

Welcome your Stephania erecta home with a nice, warm bath! Let the bulb soak in warm water for about 24 hours.

Make the bed

Choose a well-drained soil mixture, like cacti soil. To increase the drainage, you can add small stones into the potting mix. Always use a pot with drainage holes through which excess water can drain away – Stephania definitely doesn’t like wet feet!

Tuck her in

Place the bottom of the bulb about 20% into the potting mix and leave the rest sitting above the soil. Make sure not to bury the bulb completely. You can add some small stones or pebbles on top of the soil to support the caudex.
Are you not sure what side is up? Look for a woody nub or a small dry circle – this is the side that must stay upwards.

Potting your Stephania erecta

Make her feel at home

Stephania just loves humidity. She will feel more at home if you place her inside a plastic back or under a plant dome. This will increase humidity and encourage growth.

Time for a (small) drink

The Stephania Erecta is a sensitive type that does not like wet feet at all. You could even say that she has a slight fear of water. Therefore, it is important to ensure that the ‘potato’ itself never gets wet. Only pour the water over the potting soil and not over the caudex.
Water her sparingly. Until you see growth, she hardly needs any water at all. Just make sure the soil doesn’t dry out completely.

Be patient

The Stephania erecta likes to test your patience a bit. Not only does she drop her beautiful leaves every winter, but it can also take quite a while before she sprouts. After you place the bulb in the soil for the first time, it can take a few weeks up to a few months before she sprouts. But believe us, it’s worth the wait!

Is she.. dead?

Is your Stephania looking sad and is she dropping her leaves? No worries, she’s just fine!
During autumn and winter, the Stephania erecta drops her beautiful round leaves. She prepares herself for hibernation and saves her strength so she can climb to great heights again when spring arrives.

As soon as she drops her leaves, it is important to give her less and less water. When she has lost all her leaves and goes into hibernation, all she really wants is to be left alone. We can relate; nothing more annoying than being woken up when you are peacefully asleep, right?! Just leave the bulb in the soil, but stop watering her. She feeds on the water and nutrients that she stores in her bulb and doesn’t need any water until she wakes up again in spring and starts developing new growth. After this period of hibernation, she feels like reborn – literally. When spring arrives, she should come bigger and more beautiful than ever!

Are your green fingers starting to itch already? You can now find the Stephania erecta bulbs (size S+M) in our shop.

@greenhappiness_place      311 posts 11k followers

Can you tell us a bit about yourself. Where your from, how old (not necessary), description of how you live, job, hobbies etc. Or anything else you feel comfortable sharing.

I am Mirthe, 21 years old and I will be 22 on 22 April. I live in Antwerp, Belgium. At the moment, I’m still looking for a job but unfortunately, due to covid, it’s not that easy. I would really like to do something with plants, but who wouldn’t. I have done an art education (in Dutch they call it KSO). This was my thing for years, and still is! I like to draw and paint realistically. But because I am quite a perfectionist with a fear of failure, I started doing it less and less. I didn’t like drawing anymore, it was just stressful. This made me look for another passion in which I would find more peace: plants!

When did you start with having and taking care of PLNTS and why?

As I said, I was actually looking for peace. A friend of mine was already into plants and she infected me with her love of plants. I was really impressed by her plants. I started to see the beauty in plants, how beautiful nature can be. A whole new world opened up for me! It is such a nice feeling when plants grow! Now I can’t live without greenery around me.

“A friend of mine was already into plants and she infected me with her love of plants”

In these strange times have you tried any new plant activities or learned any fun new plant tricks?

Not really. But it has given me something to hold on to in these strange times. Thanks to my plant community on Instagram, I didn’t feel so alone and I still got to talk to people. I also started to spend more time with my plants, so I learned a lot about my plants in less than a year. I am so glad to have my plant community otherwise I would have had a very hard time.

You never forget your first love, and most plant parents never forget the first plant they adopt into their family. What was yours? Can you remember your first PLNT, is it still alive?

My first plant was a Monstera Deliciosa. I always loved this one but at the moment I don’t own one. What happened to that plant? Well, it did not die but it suffered from thrips. That was my first experience with thrips. When I started reading about it I lost my courage. I treated the plant twice but because I only heard dramatic stories about thrips, she ended up in the bin.

Do you name any of your PLNTS?

No I don’t, I don’t talk to my plants either haha. I call them by their real names.

“Thanks to my plant community on Instagram, I didn’t feel so alone and I still got to talk to people”

If you could go back in time, what would you tell yourself about plant parenthood when you adopted your first plant?

That is not as simple as it seems. At the beginning you think ‘ooh nice, everything is growing’. But then you have to deal with less pleasant things like plague, fungus, gnats… that’s the real thing. But don’t give up! It is something you have to go through, you will learn to deal with it.

What is your favourite variety of plants and why have you chosen it?

What a hard question. I usually collect Philodendrons, Anthuriums and Alocasia. I can also adore some Syngonium and Begonias. But I think my all-time favourite remains my Jewel Orchid. I love collecting these little gems. They are gorgeous! They are also small, so you do not need much space for them. Perfect right?

Are there any influencers in the plant world you go to for inspiration?

Definitely @rootandstem_, @theplantvisual and many more! 

Do you have any plant resolutions for 2021?

Getting a Monstera Thai, currently they are too expensive. My dream is to have a large greenhouse outside and a plant room in my own home. 

How did you manage to let your plnts survive in the heat of the Summer? Any tips?

My plants have not suffered from the heat. They even like it! But I always make sure that the air humidity in the room is up to standard, like 50-60%.

“…my all-time favourite remains my Jewel Orchid. I love collecting these little gems”

You are something of a plant expert by this point. Do you have any tips for new/expecting plant parents?

Expert is a big word, haha. Start with easy-to-maintain plants and not with the ‘hype’ plants. Also, do not spend too much money on expensive plants when you are a beginner. As a beginner you will always let a plant die, that is actually quite normal, you also learn from it. So build up gradually. In this way you can gradually increase your budget and degree of difficulty. Think for example of plants that need a high humidity to not start with. That is my advice to avoid disappointment or wasting a lot of money. You will learn to care for plants by yourself, step by step you will get there! 🙂

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We selected our top 4 plant books for you

At PLNTS.com we can’t get enough of plant inspiration and information. And where better to find that than in a beautiful plant book? We have added some of our favourite plant books to our collection for you! Whether you are looking for some deeper knowledge about your plants or some inspiration for your home, with these four beautiful books you will never miss the mark. Books full of knowledge or just beautiful images to dream away with.We have listed them for you:

1. Ultimate Wonderplants

You have plant books and you have coffee table books. This beautiful one is definitely one you want to show of on your coffeetable. The authors Irene Schampaert and Judith Baehner take you along the most beautiful, unique interiors in the world and show you that greenery and plants can be completely incorporated and are an addition to any space. Whether you live in a studio in Paris or in a fresh Bohemian house in the Dutch polder.

Besides all the inspiration, this book also contains tips and tricks on how to turn your personal space into the ultimate green home. Questions such as where to place your plant, how much time and money you want to spend on it are handled, along with plant suggestions from the authors. Ultimate Wonderplants also includes a plant doctor with the most common plant issues. No extensive photo prints but quiet, informative pages with beautiful botanical drawings. At the back you will find the interior photographs in a small format with all the names of the plants used to create your own green oasis.

In short, you want to own this book to show it off on your coffee table, but also to dream away at all the beauty that plants have to offer.

“…you want to own this book to show it off on your coffee table”

2. Urban Jungle

This joyous celebration of indoor plants is written by Judith de Graaff and Igor Josifovic of the blog and Instagram Urban Bloggers in which they share green hotspots and beautiful urban jungle interiors. Something we at PLNTS love so much!

This book takes you to 5 living rooms across Europe where you can see how beautiful, creative and sometimes even artistic green living in the home can be. Urban Jungle is full of green inspiration, style advice and useful information for anyone who wants more plants and atmosphere in their home. Above all, this book is a treasure chest of ideas to get you started with practical information about many different plants and simple tips for care. Chances are that after reading this book you will transform your own home into an urban jungle!

“Chances are that after reading this book you will transform your own home into an urban jungle!”

3. Het Plantenlab (NL)

This informative and beautifully designed book has a fresh cover and is filled with cosy illustrations and inspiring photos. Het Plantenlab is a must-have for every plant lover, starting out or experienced. The author, Judith, used to grow up in a house full of plants and when she went to live on her own, a plant in her own house could not be missing. Eventually this grew into a hobby where there was hardly any space left to sit. Not only new plants, but also ‘orphaned’ plants that had been put on the side of the street by other people, were taken home on her bike and fixed up to give to friends.

Her knowledge of plants grew through her work as a magazine editor and stylist in the most beautiful green productions. Growing her own plants, testing them, taking cuttings and talking to professionals made her a true plant expert. With this book, she wants to inspire people that a plant is for everyone, without specific prior knowledge and with all the tools to make your favourite plant a gem in your home.

Problems and questions such as light, location, temperature and water requirements, among others, are discussed in detail. Judith also gives tips on how to integrate plants even more creatively into your home by DIYs (plant hanger and concrete pots) that anyone can make without too much effort. In short, if you are a new plant lover or if your urban jungle has already expanded, this is the book you need to keep your plants happy and healthy!

“Judith also gives tips on how to integrate plants even more creatively into your home by DIYs that anyone can make without too much effort”

4. Wild at Home (DE)

This beautiful hardcover coffee table book was written by plant experts Lauren Camilleri and Sophia Kaplan. Plants provide fresh air, lift the mood and create a pleasant atmosphere in any room.

But which houseplant is right for which room? What do you need to consider when caring for them? Wild at Home provides practical tips on light, soil and water to keep houseplants happy and healthy. Everything you need to know about choosing the right pots: how to create a stylish green oasis! Numerous plant profiles: deciduous plants, succulents and cacti, as well as unusual and rare plants such as the tubular plant, the Chinese money tree and the Louisiana moss. The authors give you all the information about different houseplants and reveal how everyone can get a green thumb.

“…how to create a stylish green oasis!”

Plant trend: how to start with hydroponics

In this blog we will tell you all about hydroponics, a very trendy and decorative way to style and propagate your PLNTS in glass! After reading this blog you’ll not only know what hydroponics is, but also which plants are suitable for hydroponics, what essentials you need and how to start immediately yourself! As a bonus we have added a DIY video on the bottom of this article. The video will show you all the (easy!) steps to start.

What is hydroponics?

Hydroponics is a form of propagation or displaying of plants in which you put the roots of your plant in the spotlights. It is a propagation technique in which you put a plant cutting in water so that it can root. When the roots are strong enough you can repot the cutting in soil but you can also let it continue to grow in the water.

What are the benefits of hydroponics?

The big plus side of hydroponics is that your plant doesn’t need much attention. She will gain all the nutrition from the water. Another benefit is the cool appearance. Doesn’t it look super cool to watch the roots grow in the water behind the glass?! Because of the glass and water you can decorate your home in a light and fresh way!

Which plants are suitable for hydroponics or hydroponic propagation?

Not all houseplants are suitable for hydroponics. It’s best to choose a plant that is used to gaining nutrition from water. You can either make a cutting yourself or you can use a plant from your home that you prepare for hydroponics. In our propagation stations we use BabyPLNTS because they fit perfectly in the small vases.

Plant types that are suitable for hydroponics are:

  • Codiaeum
  • Syngonium
  • Calathea
  • Monstera
  • Philodendron
  • Pilea

Our top 5 favourites are:

Hydroponic essentials: what do you need to start hydroponic propagation?

  • A plant or cutting
  • A bowl or pot to collect the soil from the original plant
  • A bowl with lukewarm water to wash the roots of the plant
  • Glass vase, pot or a propagation set Tip: choose a size that matches the size of your plant of cutting!
  • A bottle of mineral water
  • A funnel or a bottle with pouring spout
  • A pipette
  • A bottle of plant nutrition

The 5 stages in the hydroponic process of growing plants

Step 1: Time to clean
Collect the soil from the roots in a bowl or pot.

Step 2: Bath time!
Use the bowl with lukewarm water to wash the roots as clean (and gentle!) as possible.

Step 3: Make the (water) bed
Use the funnel of pouring spout to fill the glasses of your choice with mineral water.

Step 4: Feeding time!
Use the pipette to collect a drop of nutrition and add it to the water. Add a few drops if your glass is bigger.

Step 5: Final touch
Place the roots carefully in the glass and give them a pretty place in your home!

What care does the plant need when it is growing in water?

As said before, the benefit of hydroponics is that the plant doesn’t need a lot of care. It gains all the needed nutrition from the water. It’s best to use mineral water since that water is full of vitamins and minerals that your plant will love! Another advantage is the lack of lime in mineral water which will help to keep the glass free of lime scale. Provide the plant with new water every two weeks and don’t forget to add a drop of nutrition after every change.

Start quick and easy with our propagation video

We also made a video about hydroponic propagation to help you start yourself quick and easy. Have fun!

What hydroponics products do we offer?

Have a look at our cool propogation stations below. These items will help you display your PLNTS in your home a stylish way.

Plant trend: how to make your own terrarium

You see them in all shapes and sizes. A closed terrarium is a kind of mini ecosystem. The plants in it live on recycled oxygen, water and nutrients. That’s super cool, right? We at PLNTS think it is! In this blog we will give you a list of terrarium essentials, we have highlighted our best terrarium plants and we will help you build your own terrarium step by step.

What exactly is a terrarium?

A closed terrarium is a self sufficient system, like a mini ecosystem. It does not need anything from the outside except for light. This is how it works. Before the glass jar is closed, some water is added. This water will evaporate and drips like condensation down the bottle back into the earth. The roots can easily absorb the water this way. Dry leaves of the terrarium plants will be converted into nutrients that end up in the soil. The plants get nutrition from this. This self sufficient system can keep your plants alive for years. If you like plants but don’t have such green fingers, you and the terrarium are the perfect match!

The essentials to make a terrarium of your own!

It is very easy to make your own terrarium. You can use almost anything for this: a glass jar, vase, bulb or bottle. As long as you can close the object well and the opening is not too small. You must of course be able to place the plants in it.

This is what you need:

  • Bowl of water and cloth
  • Glass object with cap or cork
  • Hydro grains, pebbles, soil or coarse stones
  • Handful of active charcoal
  • Potting soil
  • A selection of BabyPLNTS
  • Moss, shells and/or decorative stones

You can also use our ‘ready to go’ terrarium packages with incldes all the essentials! We have terrariums in three different sizes in our shop.

Which houseplants are suitable for a terrarium?

The best plants are the ones that function well in a moist environment. Examples are:

  • Fittonia
  • Calathea
  • Begonia
  • Asperagus
  • Nephrolepis

We have added a selection of our favourites below.

DIY: the steps to build your terrarium

Step 1: Bring on the shine
Use a clean wet cloth to rinse the glass that you use as your terrarium. Use a drying towel to dry the terrarium.

Step 2: Foundation first
Cover the bottom with hydro grains and a thin layer of active charcoal. These layers help the soil to drain. The active charcoal will prevent molding in your terrarium.

Step 3: Make it comfortable
Add a thick layer of potting soil so that the PLNTS can root themselves comfortably. We recommend around 5 cm.

Step 4: Time to plant the PLNTS
Start with the largest ones, remove your PLNTS from their nursery pots and make sure each one get a cozy place in the soil.

Step 5: Complete the look
Give your terrarium a personal touch by adding some moss, shells or decorative stones.

Step 6:Let her shine!
Give your terrarium a perfect place to shine in your home!

BONUS: We also made a DIY video. Watch it below to get started quick and easy!

@merakikollektiv       425 posts 25k followers

Can you tell us a bit about yourself. Where your from, how old (not necessary), description of how you live, job, hobbies etc. Or anything else you feel comfortable sharing.

Yeah sure! So my name is Felix, I am 30 years old and I’ve been living in Berlin since 2010. I am working as a photographer which is also one of my biggest passions. Besides that I created the @merakikollektiv Instagram account in September 2019. On it I post my everyday life, my job and of course my flat! I live on thirty-something square meters in a so called ‘Plattenbau’ which loosely translates to ‘industrialized building’, meaning low ceilings and concrete walls.

When did you start with having and taking care of PLNTS and why?

Well honestly it hasn’t been that long! The plant obsession started probably with me moving into my current flat about 3 years ago now. In my old flat I used to live very minimal, all blacks and whites, geometric and overall very “clean looking”. No plants whatsoever. And that was perfectly fine for the time being. My mom always wanted me to get at least some plants, she’s a huge plant lover herself, but none of mine survived for more than a few weeks or very sometimes a month. So I just got some plants and wasn’t planning on buying more myself. But when I moved to my new place, I wanted to make it feel more like ‘me’, more alive, give it more character and let it reflect my personality. So with that some of my green friends started moving in and I haven’t looked back once!

“…when I moved to my new place, I wanted to make it feel more like ‘me’, more alive, give it more character and let it reflect my personality”

In these strange times have you tried any new plant activities or learned any fun new plant tricks?

With a lot more time at home I started to get to know some plants even better. I now know, at least for the most part, when they need water, how much of it and what signs they give me mean. I think I know better how to act and take care of them now!

You never forget your first love, and most plant parents never forget the first plant they adopt into their family. What was yours? Can you remember your first PLNT, is it still alive?

I honestly can’t tell you that! As I said, I failed with a lot of plants in the beginning. What I can tell you though is that the plant is certainly no longer with us.

Do you name any of your PLNTS?

I’m starting to think I am not the best plant parent now, because I don’t! Hell, I don’t even now their botanical names for the most part. Is that bad?

“With a lot more time at home I started to get to know some plants even better”

If you could go back in time, what would you tell yourself about plant parenthood when you adopted your first plant?

Don’t get discouraged and don’t overwater your plants! I made my boyfriend (who is, thanks to my constant nagging now somewhat into plants as well) a list with some tips! For me I realized that more plants are dying because of overwatering than drying out. So stick your finger in the soil and see for yourself! Another big bullet point was patience, patience and patience! Don’t throw away your plant just because it looks kinda sad. Find out what is wrong with it! If everything fails you can always make a cutting and start from scratch.

What is your favourite variety of plants and why have you chosen it?

Yay! A question I can definitely answer. It is without a doubt every variety of Pothos! I just love this one. So much that I decorated my entire ceiling with them. They are SO easy to take care of, they look great and they are very forgiving. Also, they’ll show you what they need. If you forget them for a week or two, they won’t just leave you. They’ll fold their leaves to show you that it’s time for a drink! They actually don’t need a lot of sunlight which is great since my place barely gets any. The Pothos can, if not thrive, at least survive in low light conditions!

Are there any influencers in the plant world you go to for inspiration?

Easy! In Germany its definitely @marienova. I also love following @plantkween, @plantingplants and so so many more!

Do you have any plant resolutions for 2021?

Not really. I’d love to move someday to finally get my plants all the sunlight they deserve and also so much more space for even more plants!

How did you manage to let your plnts survive in the heat of the Summer? Any tips?

Actually, my plants don’t mind summer at all. Once the degrees climbs up, they’ll just start to grow and thrive! Obviously, you’ll have to water them more and sometimes spray them, but that’s about it for me.

“…Pothos! I just love this one. So much that I decorated my entire ceiling with them”

You are something of a plant expert by this point. Do you have any tips for new/expecting plant parents?

Well if you say so, I’ll take it! My pro tip is: get yourself a Pothos! And we go from there <3

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Everything you need to know about the moss pole!

A moss pole is a handy tool which helps your houseplant to climb to higher places. In this blog we’ll tell you all about the types of houseplants that need a moss pole and how to use and take care of the moss pole.

Which houseplants need a moss pole to grow higher?

Tropical plants like the Monstera and Philodendron are used to tropical rainforests. Due to the density of the rainforest they naturally only get enough sunlight by climbing high. The way these plants grow is by climbing onto trees in order to get more sunlight. The climbing plants have a natural desire to grow tall but the stems and leaves are too heavy to grow upwards without help. When you don’t use a moss pole (or alternative) for these plants, they will grow very wide instead of tall.

Monstera with moss pole

How to recognize climbing houseplants

You can recognize climbing plants by the aerial roots that grow on the stem on the above ground parts of the plants. These aerial roots naturally function as anchors which the plants use to attach to supporting structures like trees or rocks. When a moss pole is used, the aerial roots will attach to the pole and start growing upwards.

Aerial root of climbing houseplant

Is a moss pole made of moss?

A ‘ready to use’ moss pole, which you can find in our shop, is not made of moss (like you would expect!) but it is made of coconut fiber.

What does the moss pole do?

The coconut fiber has the same effect on the plant as moss on trees in nature: the aerial roots can attach to the coconut fiber and the plant will grow higher and higher. The moss pole helps your climbing houseplants to grow faster and higher. Also the leaves will often grow larger which makes them prettier and happier!

How to pot and tie up your plant?

First make sure that you repot the plant together with the moss pole. If you add the moss pole at a later moment, the chances are big that you damage the roots of your plant. This will not make your plant happy… Make sure that the roots of the plant are loose so that the moss pole can be added in the middle of the pot with the roots placed slightly around it. Add enough soil for the plant to stand firmly in the pot. Then it’s time to tie up the stems! The plant will not attach immediately so the stems always need to be tied up with rope or fishing line before the plant will attach to the moss pole. When the plant is comfortable with the moss pole, the aerial roots will attach to the pole and it can grow independent without rope from that moment on.Keep an eye on the growing process, sometimes the plant need some help at a later time too. Don’t hesitate to help her a little by tying her up when needed.

Plant tied up to the moss pole

Tip: keep the moss pole hydrated!

Give the fiber on the moss pole some daily spraying. When the fiber is hydrated it will stimulate the aerial roots to attach to it!

Alternatives for the ‘ready to use’ moss pole

Instead of a ‘ready to use’ moss pole you can also use a bamboo stick or you can make your own moss pole out of a branch which you cover with moss. The downside of the bamboo stick is that the plant will mot attach to the stick. You’ll need some rope of fishing line to attach the stems of your plant to the stick.

DIY: How to pot and grow your own Caladium tubers!

We love Caladiums! There are many types of Caladiums, all with their own unique and often colorful leaves. Because of their colorful appearance and beautiful leaves they are a real eye catcher in your home or in your garden!

The caladiums grow a little different than other houseplants. They grow from spring to autumn and will lose their leaves when the tuber gets ready to hibernate. We love to help you grow your own special Caladium from tuber to full grown beauty. In this blog we’ll give you tips on how to start with the potting process and we’ll give you tips for the growing process. With the right care you can keep your Caladium happy for up to 10 years!

The Caladium potting process: how to startpotting your Caladium tuber

Choose the right time to plant the Caladium tuber

In springtime the Caladium tubers start to come alive so this is the time to plant the tubers! In spring and summer the Caladiums will grow to their full size which can be up to 90 cm tall! It’s good to be aware that the Caladium will lose her leaves during autumn. Only the tuber will stay alive and she will start hibernating until next spring. Don’t worry, she will be back in full bloom next spring when you take good care of her!

Bath time!

When your tuber has arrived in her new home, treat her to a long and warm (not hot!) bath. Let her soak for one hour in water of a maximum of 50°C before planting her in her pot.

Choose the right pot for your Caladium tuber and make her bed

Most Caladium tubers have a diameter of approximately 7,5 centimeters. Choose a pot with a diameter of at least 15 cm. A pot with a diameter of at least twice the size of the tuber is advised. When you choose a bigger pot, the Caladium has more room to grow and will most likely grow bigger! To make the bed of your Caladium tuber you have to fill 2/3 of the pot with soil. Place the tuber facing upwards. Make it cozy by covering her with soil.

Tuck your Caladium in and be patient

Time to cover your friend with wrapping film. Make sure to open it every day to avoid mold. Find a shady and cozy spot with 20-25°C and wait for your Caladium to bloom in about 4 weeks.

The Caladium growing process: how to create a happy Caladium

Choose the right location to grow your Caladium

As soon as the Caladium starts to grow, the Caladium loves sunlight! Her origin is the tropical environment of Central- and South-America. Here she grows in the Amazon rainforest. Her leaves are delicate and therefor she can best be places in a spot with lots of indirect sunlight. Direct sunlight can best be avoided since this could cause burns of dry spots on her leaves. If the Caladium doesn’t get enough light she might turn more green then colored. You should relocate her to a lighter spot when this happens.

Give her the right amount of water

The Caladium is not a very thirsty type but it is important to give her enough water so that she stays hydrated, also after a sunbath. Make sure her soil is always moist, not wet! She’s not a fan of wet feet… The tuber will rot when it is too wet for too long and this will affect the lifespan of the plant and tuber. Water the Caladium twice a week during summertime and once a week during spring and autumn. When the leaves start hanging she tells you that she is thirsty!

Treat your Caladium with lots of spraying

Your Caladium loves humidity since her natural environment is also very humid! You will please her best by giving her a daily spraying session. Her delicate leaves will stay beautiful and hydrated so you will rewarded for this extra act of kindness!

Cut the flowers when you want to save your Caladiums energy

The Caladiums can grow flowers that have a strong scent. Keep in mind that the flowers will take energy from the tuber. If you prefer the tuber to concentrate the energy on the growing of new leaves, you might consider to cut off the flowers.

Take good care of the tuber during winter time

The Caladium leaves will die during fall but the tuber will continue to live. Cut off the dead leaves when they are fully dried out. The tuber will continue to gain energy from the remaining leaves and she will live on this energy during the period of hibernating. You can keep the tuber in the dry soil (stop watering it!) and place the pot somewhere in your home until springtime. Keep in mind that she’ll not survive when she needs to hibernate in too cold or too warm conditions. She will be happy with temperatures around 12 to 20°C. The process or growing will start all over again during spring. You can enjoy the Caladium for about 10 years this way!

Caladiums and pets

Be aware that Caladiums are toxic to cats and dogs. Chewing on the leaves can cause extreme irritation and swelling of the mouth. Therefor it is best to keep the Caladiums out of reach of your furry house mates.

Can’t you wait to grow your own unique and colorful Caladium?! We’ve got great news: you don’t have to! We have eight different types of Caladium tubers for sale in our shop!

@janki.home      1.030 posts 129k followers

Can you tell us a bit about yourself. Where your from, how old (not necessary), description of how you live, job, hobbies etc. Or anything else you feel comfortable sharing.

My name is Martyna, I was born in Poland and have been living in England for 10 years now with my husband and three children. I am 30 years old and I take care of the household and take care of my children, besides that I do interior design and manage my instagram @janki.home.

When did you start with having and taking care of PLNTS and why?

It all started about 3 years ago, my husband and I were shopping and he insisted on buying a new palm tree. I didn’t want this as so many of my plants didn’t survive. He won and Areca came home with us from shopping… this is where our whole plant adventure started!

“He won and Areca came home with us from shopping… this is where our whole plant adventure started!”

In these strange times have you tried any new plant activities or learned any fun new plant tricks?

I learned to grow Pilea plants, it is super simple and I gave all kinds of small cuttings to friends and family. I also had an adventure with my Calathea Orbifolia, her leaves were falling out, it was so sad. I was devastated that she was going to die. But luckily I managed to save the plant after good care, put it in the shower and watered it profusely. She put me under so much stress.

You never forget your first love, and most plant parents never forget the first plant they adopt into their family. What was yours? Can you remember your first PLNT, is it still alive?

My first plant was Areka, who still belongs to our family and grows happily from our living room. But actually my first love is the white Strelitzia, I think this plant is the most beautiful.

Do you name any of your PLNTS?

I don’t name my plants because there are so many of them and my bad memory with names. Sometimes I am confused even with my kids their names and when I want to name the correct one, I name the other two first. But! I talk to my plants when I water them, just like I talk to my kids.

“I talk to my plants when I water them, just like I talk to my kids.”

If you could go back in time, what would you tell yourself about plant parenthood when you adopted your first plant?

When we bought our first plant, I was convinced that it would die like all my other plants. However, I still managed to keep the plant alive. I started with good care and then it all went quickly. Since then, more and more plants have come to live with us.

What is your favourite variety of plants and why have you chosen it?

I like the Strelitzia family best for their appearance. They are my favorite! I also love the String of Pearls but two of them did not survive. I am really into this plant but unfortunately I have trouble keeping it alive.

Are there any influencers in the plant world you go to for inspiration?

That seems like a no. I rarely get inspired by others and that is mainly because I have little time for that. Managing my household, childcare and instagram takes up a lot of my time.

Do you have any plant resolutions for 2021?

More, more and more plants! I even recently sold some of my bedroom furniture to make room for even more green friends.

How did you manage to let your plnts survive in the heat of the Summer? Any tips?

I live in England so our summers are not very hot. I actually have more problems with the winter, many of my plants have problems during this period.

“I like the Strelitzia family best for their appearance. They are my favorite!”

You are something of a plant expert by this point. Do you have any tips for new/expecting plant parents?

I advise you to be as interested in your plants as if they were your own children. Keep track of them, observe them and give them a lot of attention. I can say that I put a piece of my heart into caring for my plants.

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